Thursday, July 20, 2017

Summer is coming

I'm getting ready to attend Black Hat. I will miss BSides and Defcon this year unfortunately due to some personal commitments. And as I'm packing up my gear, I started thinking about what these conferences have really changed. We've been doing this every summer for longer than many of us can remember now. We make our way to the desert, we attend talks by what we consider the brightest minds in our industry. We meet lots of people. Everyone has a great time. But what is the actionable events that come from these things.

The answer is nothing. They've changed nothing.

But I'm going to put an asterisk next to that.

I do think things are getting better, for some definition of better. Technology is marching forward, security is getting dragged along with a lot of it. Some things, like IoT, have some learning to do, but the real change won't come from the security universe.

Firstly we should understand that the world today has changed drastically. The skillset that mattered ten years ago doesn't have a lot of value anymore. Things like buffer overflows are far less important than they used to be. Coding in C isn't quite what it once was. There are many protections built into frameworks and languages. The cloud has taken over a great deal of infrastructure. The list can go on.

The point of such a list is to ask the question, how much of the important change that's made a real difference came from our security leaders? I'd argue not very much. The real change comes from people we've never heard of. There are people in the trenches making small changes every single day. Those small changes eventually pile up until we notice they're something big and real.

Rather than trying to fix the big problems, our time is better spent ignoring the thought leaders and just doing something small. Conferences are important, but not to listen to the leaders. Go find the vendors and attendees who are doing new and interesting things. They are the ones that will make a difference, they are literally the future. Even the smallest bug bounty, feature, or pull request can make a difference. The end goal isn't to be a noisy gasbag, instead it should be all about being useful.



Saturday, July 8, 2017

Who's got your hack back?

The topic of hacking back keeps coming up these days. There's an attempt to pass a bill in the US that would legalize hacking back. There are many opinions on this topic, I'm generally not one to take a hard stand against what someone else thinks. In this case though, if you think hacking back is a good idea, you're wrong. Painfully wrong.

Everything I've seen up to this point tells me the people who think hacking back is a good idea are either mistaken about the issue or they're misleading others on purpose. Hacking back isn't self defense, it's not about being attacked, it's not about protection. It's a terrible idea that has no place in a modern society. Hacking back is some sort of stone age retribution tribal law. It has no place in our world.

Rather than break the various argument apart. Let's think about two examples that exist in the real world.

Firstly, why don't we give the people doing mall security guns? There is one really good reasons I can think of here. The insurance company that holds the policy on the mall would never allow the security to carry guns. If you let security carry guns, they will use them someday. They'll probably use them in an inappropriate manner, the mall will be sued, and they will almost certainly lose. That doesn't mean the mall has to pay a massive settlement, it means the insurance company has to pay a massive settlement. They don't want to do that. Even if some crazy law claims it's not illegal to hack back, no sane insurance company will allow it. I'm not talking about cyber insurance, I'm just talking about general policies here.

The second example revolves around shoplifting. If someone is caught stealing from a store, does someone go to their house and take some of their stuff in retribution? They don't of course. Why not? Because we're not cave people anymore. That's why. Retribution style justice has no place in a modern civilization. This is how a feud starts, nobody has ever won a feud, at best it's a draw when they all kill each other.

So this has me really thinking. Why would anyone want to hack back? There aren't many reasons that don't revolve around revenge. The way most attacks work you can't reliably know who is doing what with any sort of confidence. Hacking back isn't going to make anything better. It would make things a lot worse. Nobody wants to be stuck in the middle of a senseless feud. Well, nobody sane.